Car Tints should be legalized already

tintedcarOkay, today I’m in the mood of talking something rather controversial instead of geeky stuff. Hey, I’m a blogger afterall and I’m trying to keep this blog not just focused to tech-stuff – which I’m failing miserably at the moment. lol. So I got myself the Peugeot 508 earlier this year in February and I have yet to tint Phantom (that’s its name, btw). I’m looking at Huper Optik and might be doing it very soon. I was still wondering about the legal issues on tinting full dark and started compiling a list of why it should be legalized.

Protect your belongings

I carry a lot of expensive devices with me at one time – especially when I’m on the move to my office. My laptop itself is worth RM10K, a tablet, a smartphone, iPod Touch, and of course cash. I put them on my side seat to make my drive easy. Now, my Phantom has a decent locking system in which there is no way for door access from outside once it auto locks the car and is in drive mode. But then, the thief can break the glass and still have access to my belongings. Only if he actually sees it. So if I tint my car dark, he will not even know what is inside my car in the first place. That gives me a plus.

Reduce Fuel Consumption

This is undoubtedly true. Air-conditioner is one of the biggest fuel consumer in the car. My Phantom was tested in normal driving conditions with and without air-conditioning and I got a mileage difference of 110km! Yes, I was shocked to discover this myself! And it also matters on the number of air-conditioners running (given that my Phantom has quad-zone conditioning), and the temperature it has to maintain. So if my car is dark, its already cool from the inside, considering Malaysia’s climate. I will have to still switch on the air-conditioning, but I don’t have to run it at high speed and low temperature. That will save me plenty of fuel.

No Skin Cancer

I did a lot of reading on this really. Apparently our sun has three main UV rays – UVA, UVB and UVC. While the third one is less harmful, the first one is known to play their role in causing skin cancer. These range between 400nm – 290nm wavelength band and are pretty hard to repel. Under very dark conditions, these rays are close to none, reducing skin cancer to its maximum. We drive everyday, so why not protect ourselves while we are on the road? If we know the cause and shut one eye over it, that’s just like knowing that smoking is harmful, but some people still do it – while others really want to avoid it altogether.

Reduce Road Rage

There was one time, a guy drove next to my car, asking me to stop by the road in a very rude manner – like as if he was a cop or something. I got really pissed and I stopped my car by the road side. He stopped a few metres ahead of mine. I got out of my car and walked towards his car. Then suddenly the bugger just sped off. I think he got scared with my big size perhaps? But I know I was going to squish out his eyes so he can never be on the road again. Sounds violent right? It all started with an eye contact. If my car was dark, maybe the initiation wouldn’t have started at all. Would be peaceful right?

Avoid Tailgaters

Sometimes it really annoys me when people ride their bikes, on the fast lane, and tailgate cars like as if they were driving a Ferrari. What is going on in their minds? One hit of the brake and you are D.E.D dude! But these guys rely on what is in front of my car. Logically. So if my car is dark, he can’t tailgate me for sure because he will not be able to see what is in front of my vehicle. That is just another reason for safer driving.

Ladies will be safer

Ladies tend to be the first target victims. It could be their handbags, their jewellery, or even their gadgets. Ladies are easy target – only if the bugger will know that she is a lady. If the windows are dark, they can’t even guess who is in the car. Unless they have been following her from the beginning; but that’s another story. At least its still a legit point for first contact while on the move.

I don’t see why do the legal enforcement officers still want to force the tinting limits on the users. If they really want to identify the car owner, they already have robust tools for that to check against the plate number. When the good surpasses the bad, the ban should be lifted imho.